© 2020 FORT HUNTER FREE LIBRARY, 167 FORT HUNTER RD, AMSTERDAM NY 12010          TELEPHONE:  518.829.7248


 

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Message from Our Board President:

 

Friends, in light of the current State of Emergency for Montgomery County, and in a desire to do everything we can to help our community stay healthy, the Fort Hunter Free Library will be closed for the duration of the State of Emergency, which currently ends on March 31. We will keep everyone updated if anything changes.

 

Remember, we are fine free, so there is no worry about bringing back due or overdue items. We will be checking with the Mohawk Valley Library System tomorrow for instructions and advice on how to handle any interlibrary loans or requested items.

 

Stay safe, be kind, wash your hands,  and read a book.

Thank you,

Beverly Osborne, President

Fort Hunter Free Library

Community mitigation strategies are crucial to slowing the transmission of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), particularly before a vaccine or treatment becomes available. These strategies provide essential protections to individuals at risk of severe illness and to health care and other critical infrastructure workforces. Preventing a sudden, sharp increase in the number of people infected with COVID-19 will help minimize disruptions to daily life and limit the demand on health care providers and facilities. These recommended strategies apply at the individual, organizational, and community levels. They apply to businesses, workplaces, schools, community organizations, health care institutions, and individuals of all ages, backgrounds, and health profiles. Everyone has some measure of responsibility to help limit the spread of this disease. Even individuals who are healthy can help prevent the spread of COVID-19 to others. New Yorkers have been preparing for COVID-19 for weeks, and all individuals should continue to take the following basic personal-hygiene measures to prevent the spread of the virus:

• wash your hands often with soap and water or use hand sanitizer;

• avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands;

• cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing;

• avoid handshakes;

• avoid contact with sick people who are sick; and

• stay home when you are sick

New York must take further action, however. To help avoid a rapid increase of cases in the state,  it is recommended that we implement the following community mitigation strategies. For up to date information from the NYS Department of Health, click on this link: 

https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/communicable/coronavirus/

 

Individuals and families at home:

1. Learn about the signs and symptoms of COVID-19. Symptoms include fever, cough, and difficulty breathing.

2. If you have respiratory symptoms, STAY HOME WHEN YOU ARE SICK. Call your health care provider’s office in advance of your visit.

3. Regularly clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces, like doorknobs, keyboards, cell phones, and light switches.

4. Communicate and reinforce best practices for washing hands and covering coughs and sneezes.

5. Be prepared if there is COVID-19 in your household or a disruption of daily activities in your community. For example, maintain a supply of medications, food, and other essentials in your house. Consider alternative shopping options such as curbside pickups or online deliveries.

6. Access services as much as possible online or by phone.

 

Individuals at risk of severe illness:

These individuals include, but are not limited to, older adults and persons of any age with underlying medical conditions, such as persons with a blood disorder (e.g., sickle cell disease or a disorder being treated with blood thinners), an endocrine disorder (e.g., diabetes mellitus), or a metabolic disorder (such as inborn error of metabolism); those with heart disease, lung disease (including asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), chronic kidney disease, or chronic liver disease; those with a compromised immune system (e.g., those who are receiving treatments such as radiation or chemotherapy, who have received an organ or bone marrow transplant, who are taking high doses of immunosuppressant, or who have HIV or AIDS); those who are currently pregnant or were pregnant in the last two weeks; and those with neurological or neurologic and neurodevelopment conditions.  

1. Individuals at risk of severe illness should stay at home and keep away from others who are sick, except in exceptional circumstances. Wash your hands often, particularly after contact with high-touch surfaces. Avoid crowds and closed-in settings with little air ventilation as much as possible. Avoid cruise travel and non-essential air travel.

2. Regularly clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces, like doorknobs, keyboards, cell phones, and light switches.

3. In households with individuals at risk of severe illness, provide a protected space for those individuals and have healthy people conduct themselves as if they were a significant risk to those individuals. For example, healthy people should wash their hands before feeding or caring for an at-risk individual.

4. Have a plan for if you get sick, and stay in touch with others by phone or email.

5. Watch for symptoms and emergency warning signs that require immediate medical attention.

6. Family members and caregivers can support older adults by knowing what medications they are taking and ensuring there is an extra supply on hand.

7. Family members and caregivers can support older adults by monitoring food and other necessary medical supplies (e.g., oxygen, incontinence, dialysis, and wound care supplies) and by creating a back-up plan for securing those essentials if they run out.

Community and faith-based organizations:

1. Identify safe ways to serve those who are at high risk or vulnerable through outreach and assistance.

2. Encourage staff and members to stay home when sick and to notify the organization of illness.

3. Communicate and reinforce best practices for washing hands and covering coughs and sneezes.

4. Regularly clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces, like doorknobs, keyboards, cell phones, and light switches.

5. Ensure hand hygiene supplies are readily accessible.

6. Implement social distancing measures as feasible.

7. Reduce in-person gatherings and activities, especially for organizations with individuals at risk of severe illness. Consider offering video or audio of events.

8. Determine ways to continue providing support services to individuals at risk of severe illness while limiting group settings and exposures.

9. Avoid large gatherings (e.g., greater than 100 people in a shared space) or move to smaller and staggered gatherings.

 

Other mass events:

1. Cancel or postpone large gatherings, conferences, and sporting events (e.g., greater than 100 people in a shared space).

2. Regularly clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces, like doorknobs, keyboards, and light switches.

3. Communicate and reinforce best practices for washing hands and covering coughs and sneezes.

COVID-19 Information